General Education Requirements

All Honors Program candidates complete the Honors Program curriculum listed within the Program of Study section, rather than the General Education Requirements described below.

Bachelor of Music candidates follow the General Education Requirements outlined under “Major and Minor Requirements: Department of Music” within the Program of Study section.

All other candidates for either the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degrees must satisfy the University’s General Education Requirements. This curriculum is designed to provide students with the abilities and broad liberal arts background necessary for living lives of purpose with distinction.

Courses fulfilling more than one General Education Requirement

A single course may be counted in up to three different abilities categories. When a course fulfills an Abilities Requirement, but is also listed within the Breadth of Academic Experience (Fine Arts, Humanities, Natural Sciences, or Social Sciences), Global Cultural Perspectives, and/or Personal Health and Wellness requirements, this course may also be used to fulfill a requirement in one or more of these categories.

I. Abilities Requirements: Students take courses addressing five abilities related to thinking and communication. The number of courses required differs according to the ability.

a. Critical Thinking Ability: Students should be able to demonstrate good critical thinking skills. Critical thinking is imbedded into the courses that fulfill Abilities Requirements; however, there are no specific course requirements within this ability category.

Definition: Critical thinking is defined by Robert Ennis as “reasonable reflective thinking focused on deciding what to believe or do.” Critical thinking skills include clearly stating a reasonable position on a topic; developing and supporting that position fully and consistently with sufficient well chosen reasons, examples, data and/or details; and when appropriate providing pertinent documentation of any sources referenced. The critical thinker can interpret, analyze, evaluate, and make a decision regarding the statements of others.

b. Oral Communication Ability: All students must pass COM 100 or the equivalent. (In addition, see major related requirements for the Junior Level Discipline-Specific Communication course and Senior Capstone Experience.)

COM 100, Oral Communication I, enables the student to listen critically, arrive at intelligent decisions and speak effectively. The public speaking course helps the student to identify and appeal to different audiences, stimulate understanding by skillful presentation of information and support claims with appropriate evidence. The requirement may be met by examination, unless a CTA major.

Learning Outcomes: In completing the Oral Communication Ability requirements, students will exhibit competence in rhetorical awareness; utilize critical thinking to present a clear purpose/thesis supported by appropriate examples/evidence; use appropriate vocal variety, pronunciation/grammar/articulation, non-verbal behaviors, and (when applicable) visual aids; and cite sources according to disciplinary practice.

c. Quantitative Literacy Ability (Q): All students must pass one Quantitative Literacy Ability course.

Students may not take Quantitative Literacy Ability courses until they have passed MTH 090 or the equivalent.

Quantitative Literacy Ability courses provide students with the capability to critique or construct arguments that involve mathematical and statistical ideas specific to the discipline. Quantitative literacy courses will include assignments that focus on computational algebra skills (such as relationships, formulas, functions and diagrams) and/or probability and statistics skills (such as standard deviation and basic principles of probability).

Learning outcomes: Quantitative literacy includes two levels of quantitative skills. Pre-College Skills include competency in basic arithmetic, basic algebra, and descriptive geometry. The overall learning outcome at the College Skills level is that students should demonstrate the ability to critique or construct arguments that involve mathematical and statistical ideas.

Transfer students (including students at the Arrowhead campus) must pass one Quantitative Literacy course.

Quantitative Literacy Ability courses are designated with a (Q) symbol on semester course listings. A complete list of “Q” courses may be found below:

  • Accounting 334- Federal Income Tax
  • Accounting 474- Advanced Accounting
  • Anthropology 325- Forensic Anthropology
  • Biology 205- Biostatistics
  • Geology 308- Surface Water Systems
  • Geology 350- Soils and Groundwater
  • Management 490- Strategic Management
  • Mathematics 115- Quantitative Reasoning
  • Mathematics 121- Elementary Functions
  • Mathematics 210- Elementary Statistics
  • Mathematics 222- Calculus I
  • Physics 101- General Physics I
  • Physics 102- General Physics II
  • Political Science 344- Research Methods
  • Psychology 201- Research Methods and Data Analysis I

d. Reading Ability (R): All students must pass six Reading Ability courses.

Reading Ability courses will expose students to a variety of genres and reading materials (articles, newspapers, texts, essays, etc.) specific to the discipline and at a difficulty level appropriate to the course level. Reading courses will include assignments that are often made in concert with writing, oral language, and/or critical thinking skills.

Learning Outcomes: Students will, through reading a variety of reading sources, demonstrate the ability to comprehend the historical positioning of the author and the reader in relation to the context of the work; analyze the purpose of that reading material in the context of the course; evaluate the work through discipline-specific criteria; and apply the information gained from one context to another context.

The number of Reading Ability courses required of transfer students (including students at the Arrowhead campus) is dependent upon the number of semester hours they transfer into Heidelberg.

  • 1-23 semester hours transferred: 6 Reading Abilities courses required
  • 24-55 semester hours transferred: 4 Reading Abilities courses required
  • 56-87 semester hours transferred: 2 Reading Abilities courses required
  • 88+ semester hours transferred: 1 Reading Abilities course required

Reading Ability courses are designated with an (R) symbol on semester course listings. A complete list of “R” courses may be found below:

  • Accounting 334- Federal Income Tax
  • Accounting 373- Accounting Information Systems
  • Anthropology 200- Cultural Anthropology
  • Anthropology 300-Native North Americans
  • Anthropology 345- Drug Dealers & Prostitutes
  • ART 118- Art and the Visual Experience
  • Athletic Training 180- Advanced Emergency Care
  • Athletic Training 382- Therapeutic Exercise
  • Biology 223- Genetics
  • Biology 224- Cell and Molecular Biology
  • Biology 311- Biology Seminar
  • Biology 312- Evolution
  • Biology 334- Ecology
  • Biology 415- Animal Behavior
  • Communication 346- Popular Culture and Communication
  • Economics 330- Public Finance
  • Economics 346- Law and Economics
  • Economics 362- Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory
  • Education 218- Adolescent Literature
  • Education 345- Curriculum and Instruction for Young Children
  • English 102- Literary Genres
  • English 151- Literary Theme: The Individual versus Society
  • English 152- Literary Theme: Literature Into Film
  • English 153- Literary Theme: Fantasy
  • English 154- Literary Theme: Identity and Culture
  • English 205- Literature of the Ancient World
  • English 206- Literature of the Modern World
  • English 221- English Literature to 1798
  • English 222- English Literature, 1798 to the Present
  • English 231- American Literature to 1860
  • English 232- American Literature, 1860 to the Present
  • English 291- Introduction to Literary Theory
  • English 306- African American Literature
  • English 307- Literature by Women
  • English 330- Studies in the Novel
  • English 340- Major World Author
  • English 346- Shakespeare
  • English 350- Studies in British Literature
  • English 355- Studies in American Literature
  • English 360- Studies in World Literature
  • English 491- Senior Seminar in Literature
  • Environmental Science 300- Issues in Environmental Science
  • Geology 308- Surface Water Systems
  • Health & Physical Education 314- Administration School of Health Program
  • Health & Physical Education 454- Adaptive Physical Education
  • Health & Physical Education 490- Capstone Course
  • Health Sciences 290- Applied Pharmacology and Pathology
  • Health Sciences 425- Healthcare Seminar
  • Health Sciences 485- Healthcare Administration
  • Health Sciences 487- Exercise Physiology
  • History 311- Classical World
  • History 321- Medieval History
  • History 322- Renaissance and Reformation
  • History 325- Modern Europe
  • History 332- History of the Modern Middle East
  • History 333- History of Modern China
  • History 357- History of England
  • History 359- History of Germany
  • Management 320- Organizational Behavior
  • Management 340- Human Resource Management
  • Music 213- World Music
  • Music 216- Conducting I
  • Music 359- Chamber Literature
  • Music 363- Music Education Early Childhood/Elementary School
  • Music 369- Leadership in Entrepreneurship in the Arts
  • Music 373- Choral Music Education Secondary Curriculum
  • Music 374- Instrumental Music Education Secondary Curriculum
  • Non-Departmental 105- Truth About Social Class
  • Non-Departmental 112- Women in Art
  • Non-Departmental 128- Learning Process in an Academic Environment
  • Non-Departmental 301- Literature and Fine Arts
  • Non-Departmental 302- Literature and Fine Arts
  • Public Relations 357- Principles of Public Relations
  • Political Science 323- Political Culture
  • Political Science 379- Global Issues: Political Development
  • Psychology 101- General Psychology
  • Psychology 206- Child Psychology
  • Psychology 207- Adolescent Psychology
  • Psychology 305- Adult Development
  • Psychology 321- The Brain and Behavior
  • Psychology 491- Classical, Contemporary, and Ethical Issues in Psychology
  • Religion 109- Judaism, Catholicism and Protestantism
  • Religion 201- Introduction to the Old Testament
  • Religion 202- Introduction to the New Testament
  • Religion 204- Religions of the World
  • Religion 250- Christian Social Ethics
  • Religion 302- Topics in Biblical Literature
  • Religion 308- History of Christian Thought
  • Religion 309- Contemporary Christian Thought
  • Religion 340- Topics in Religion
  • COR 300- Religion and Politics in America
  • COR 300- Romantic Revival

e. Writing Ability (W): All students must pass five Writing Ability courses, English 101 or the equivalent. (In addition, see major related requirements for the Junior Level Discipline-Specific Communication course and Senior Capstone Experience.)

English 101 is the required portion of the Heidelberg first-year writing program. In order to effectively serve Heidelberg’s student body, the first-year writing program features a two-tiered structure. The primary course, the completion of which satisfies the University’s writing proficiency requirement, is English 101. For students who—through a process of directed self-placement—view themselves as not adequately prepared for English 101, a preliminary course, English 100, will serve as preparation for English 101.

Writing Ability courses are courses that emphasize writing. Writing courses include at least one assignment that requires students to find and utilize appropriate and credible sources in support of a valid and defendable thesis. Writing courses will include assignments that are often made in concert with reading, oral language, and critical thinking skills.

Learning Outcomes: Students should produce quality prose writing in English and should demonstrate the ability to incorporate others’ ideas—from written and other sources—into their own discourse.

The number of Writing Abilities courses required of transfer students (including students at the Arrowhead campus) is dependent upon the number of semester hours they transfer into Heidelberg. Transfer students without the equivalent of English 101 on their transcripts must take that course as one of their required Writing Ability courses.

  • 1-23 semester hours transferred: 5 Writing Ability courses required
  • 24-55 semester hours transferred: 3 Writing Ability courses required
  • 56-87 semester hours transferred: 2 Writing Ability courses required
  • 88+ semester hours transferred: 1 Writing Ability course required

Writing Ability courses are designated with a (W) symbol on semester course listings. A complete list of “W” courses may be found below:

  • Anthropology 300- Native North Americans
  • Anthropology 335- Death and Burial
  • Anthropology 355- Ethnozoology
  • Athletic Training 381- Therapeutic Modalities
  • Athletic Training 382- Therapeutic Exercise
  • Biology 312- Evolution
  • Biology 325- Microbiology
  • Biology 334- Ecology
  • Biology 415- Animal Behavior
  • Communication 346- Popular Culture & Communication
  • Economics 346- Law and Economics
  • Economics 361- Intermediate Microeconomic Theory
  • Education 227- Principals of Teaching Seminar: Middle Childhood
  • Education 228- Principals of Teaching Seminar: Adolescent to Young Adult
  • Education 229- Principals of Teaching Seminar: Multi-Age
  • Education 321- Language/Literacy Development in Early Childhood
  • Education 324- Teaching Written Composition
  • Education 345- Curriculum and Instruction for Young Children
  • Education 347- Reading to Learn in the Content Area: Multi Age
  • Education 350- Reading to Learn in the Content Area: Middle/AYA
  • English 151- Literary Theme: The Individual versus Society
  • English 152- Literary Theme: Literature Into Film
  • English 153- Literary Theme: Fantasy
  • English 154- Literary Theme: Identity and Culture
  • English 213- Intermediate Writing
  • English 291- Introduction to Literary Theory
  • English 306- African American Literature
  • English 307- Literature by Women
  • English 313- Technical Writing
  • English 330- Studies in the Novel
  • English 340- Major World Author
  • English 350- Studies in British Literature
  • English 355- Studies in American Literature
  • English 360- Studies in World Literature
  • English 491- Senior Seminar in Literature
  • English 492- Senior Seminar in Writing
  • Environmental Science 300- Issues in Environmental Science
  • Environmental Science 370- Internship
  • Health Sciences 290- Applied Pharmacology and Pathology
  • Health Sciences 487- Exercise Physiology
  • Health Sciences 490- Research Methods in Health Sciences
  • History 311- Classical World
  • History 321- Medieval History
  • History 322- Renaissance and Reformation
  • History 325- Modern Europe
  • History 332- History of the Modern Middle East
  • History 333- History of Modern China
  • History 357- History of England
  • History 359- History of Germany
  • Health & Physical Education 314- Administration School of Health Program
  • Health & Physical Education 454- Adaptive Physical Education
  • Health & Physical Education 490- Capstone Course
  • Media 156- Mass Media in Society
  • Media 211- Computer-Mediated Communication
  • Media 212- Introduction to Journalism
  • Management 300- Principles of Management
  • Management 340- Human Resource Management
  • Management 490- Strategic Management
  • Music 110- Intro to the Teaching of Music and Related Careers
  • Music 213- World Music
  • Music 246- History and Literature: Romantic and 20th Century
  • Music 359- Chamber Literature for Winds/Strings and Piano
  • Music 374- Instrumental Music Education in the Secondary Curriculum
  • Non-Departmental 105- Truth About Social Class
  • Non-Departmental 366- Sex and Violence in Fairy Tales
  • Public Relations 357- Principles of Public Relations
  • Philosophy 140- Introduction to Philosophy
  • Philosophy 200- Aesthetics
  • Philosophy 309- History of Western Philosophy: Ancient and Medieval
  • Philosophy 310- History of Western Philosophy: Modern
  • Philosophy 317- Philosophy of Religion
  • Philosophy 490- Philosophy Colloquium
  • Political Science 283- Politics of the Middle East
  • Political Science 293- Introduction to Canada
  • Political Science 324- American Foreign Policy
  • Political Science 377- Global Issues II
  • Psychology 201- Research Methods and Data
  • Psychology 321- The Brain and Behavior
  • Psychology 491- Classical, Contemporary, and Ethical Issues in Psychology
  • Religion 250- Christian Social Ethics
  • Religion 302- Topics in Biblical Literature
  • Religion 308- History of Christian Thought
  • Religion 309- Contemporary Christian Thought
  • Religion 413- Independent Study
  • Religion 414- Independent Study
  • Religion 475- Honors Course
  • Religion 476- Honors Course
  • COR 300- Religion and Politics in America
  • COR 300- Romantic Revival

II. Breadth of Academic Experience Requirement:

All students must pass two courses from two different prefixes in each of four disciplinary areas. The four disciplinary areas are listed and defined below:

a. Fine Arts (F)
Learning Outcomes: Students should demonstrate an understanding of the aesthetic value of the Fine Arts through one or more of the following areas: critical analysis of the artistic experience; active participation in the creative process; reflection on the relationship between the Fine Arts and our global culture.

Fine Arts courses are designated with a (F) symbol on semester course listings. A complete list of “F” courses may be found below:

  • Art 102- Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art and Graphics
  • Art 103- Introduction to Three-Dimensional Art
  • Art 118- Art and Visual Experience
  • Art 131- Graphic Design
  • Art 312- Studio Art
  • Art 355- Art Fundamentals
  • Art 358- Elementary Art Methods
  • English 210- Creative Writing
  • English 311- Advanced Poetry Writing
  • English 312- Advanced Fiction Writing
  • Media 226- Electronic Media Production I
  • Media 255- Topics in Film Studies
  • Media 256- History and Criticism of Film
  • Music 100- Major Ensemble
  • Music 105- Fundamentals of Music
  • Music 127- Non-Major Performance
  • Music 128- Non-Major Performance
  • Music 141- Opera Workshop
  • Music 149- Understanding and Enjoying Music
  • Music 200- Major Ensemble
  • Music 227- Non-Major Performance
  • Music 228- Non-Major Performance
  • Music 241- Opera Workshop
  • Music 300- Major Ensemble
  • Music 327- Non-Major Performance
  • Music 328- Non-Major Performance
  • Music 341- Opera Workshop
  • Music 400- Major Ensemble
  • Music 427- Non-Major Performance
  • Music 428- Non-Major Performance
  • Music 441- Opera Workshop
  • Non-Departmental 112- Women in Art
  • Non-Departmental 301- Literature and Fine Arts
  • Non-Departmental 302- Literature and Fine Arts
  • Philosophy 200- Aesthetics
  • Physics 104- Introduction to Photography
  • Theatre 150- Introduction to the Theatre
  • Theatre 207- Acting
  • Theatre 219- Experiential Learning in Theatre Production
  • Theatre 220- Experiential Learning in Theatre Performance
  • Theatre 306- Play Production: Directing
  • Theatre 307- Advanced Acting
  • Theatre 320- Play Production: Musical Theatre
  • Theatre 407- Advanced Acting II

b. Humanities (H)
Learning Outcomes: Through writing and speaking, students will demonstrate an understanding of the Humanities through one or more of the following areas: recognize and reflect upon universal cultural themes; critique ideas and theories using textual evidence to support claims; connect artifacts to their varied cultural contexts and meanings.

Humanities courses are designated with a (H) symbol on semester course listings. A complete list of “H” courses may be found below:

  • Anthropology 347- Cities and Society
  • Communication 346- Popular Culture and Communication
  • Education 218- Adolescent Literature
  • English 102- Literary Genres
  • English 151- Literary Theme: The Individual versus Society
  • English 152- Literary Theme: Literature Into Film
  • English 153- Literary Theme: Fantasy
  • English 154- Literary Theme: Identity and Culture
  • English 205- Literature of the Ancient World
  • English 206- Literature of the Modern World
  • English 221- English Literature to 1798
  • English 222- English Literature, 1798 to the Present
  • English 231- American Literature to 1860
  • English 291- Introduction to Literary Theory
  • English 306- African American Literature
  • English 307- Literature by Women
  • English 232- American Literature, 1860 to Present
  • English 330- Studies in the Novel
  • English 340- Major World Author
  • English 346- Shakespeare
  • English 350- Studies in British Literature
  • English 355- Studies in American Literature
  • English 491- Senior Seminar in Literature
  • German 417- Periods in German Literature
  • German 418- Periods in German Literature
  • History 105- World Civilization
  • History 106- World Civilization
  • History 107- History of the United States to 1865
  • History 108- History of the United States, 1865 to the Present
  • History 113- Asian Civilizations I
  • History 114- Asian Civilizations II
  • Music 211- Journey of the Blues
  • Philosophy 216- Ethics
  • Philosophy 140- Introduction to Philosophy
  • Philosophy 309- History of Western Philosophy: Ancient and Medieval
  • Philosophy 310- History of Western Philosophy: Modern
  • Philosophy 317- Philosophy of Religion
  • Philosophy 490- Philosophy Colloquium
  • Political Science 293- Introduction to Canada
  • Political Science 315- Art and Espionage
  • Political Science 323- Political Culture
  • Religion 109- Judaism, Catholicism and Protestantism
  • Religion 201- Introduction to the Old Testament
  • Religion 202- Introduction to the New Testament
  • Religion 204- Religions of the World
  • Religion 339- Topics in Religion
  • Religion 250- Christian Social Ethics
  • Religion 302- Topics in Biblical Literature
  • Religion 308- History of Christian Thought
  • Religion 309- Contemporary Christian Thought
  • Religion 340- Topics in Religion
  • Religion 413- Independent Study
  • Religion 414- Independent Study
  • Religion 475- Honors Course
  • Religion 476- Honors Course
  • Religion 490- Senior Seminar
  • Spanish 321- Survey of Latin American Literature
  • Spanish 330- Contemporary Latin American Narrative
  • Spanish 333- Spanish Culture and Civilization
  • Theatre 325- Drama to 1900
  • Theatre 327- Modern Drama
  • Women’s and Gender Studies 100- Intro to Women’s and Gender Studies
  • Women’s and Gender Studies 400- Gender Theory
  • COR 300- Romantic Revival

c. Natural Sciences (N)
Learning Outcomes: Students should demonstrate a thorough understanding of the Natural Sciences through one or more of the following areas: an understanding of the nature of scientific inquiry, and methods scientists use to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, and evaluation of evidence; an understanding of the application of scientific concepts, models, evidence and data in the natural sciences and perform basic applications; they can analyze and evaluate scientific information and are prepared to make informed decisions on contemporary issues involving scientific information acquired in the course. One course must have a laboratory component; a laboratory alone cannot fulfill the course requirement. Each course offering a lab include (L) behind the course number.

Natural Science courses are designated with a (N) symbol on semester course listings. A complete list of “N” courses may be found below:

  • Anthropology 205- Physical Anthropology
  • Anthropology 325- Forensic Anthropology
  • Athletic Training 213- Anatomy for Orthopedic Assessment
  • Biology 110- Contemporary Biological Problems (L)
  • Biology 115- Food, Medicine, and Drugs
  • Biology 123- Biology I (L)
  • Chemistry 103- Fundamentals of Chemistry (L)
  • Chemistry 111- General Chemistry (L),
  • Computer Science 150- Fundamentals of Computer Science (L)
  • Environmental Science 101- Introduction to Environmental Science (L)
  • Forensic Science 101- Introduction to Forensic Science (L)
  • Geology 101- Physical Geology (L)
  • Geology 201- Environmental Geology
  • Health Sciences 487- Exercise Physiology
  • Physics 100- Introduction to Physical Principles (L)
  • Physics 101- General Physics I (L)
  • Physics 102- General Physics II (L)
  • Physics 172- Introduction to Astronomy

d. Social Sciences (S)
Learning Outcomes: Students should demonstrate an understanding of variables that affect social structures and phenomena through one or more of the following areas: describe how individuals and groups are influenced by social, cultural, or political institutions; demonstrate an understanding of methods used in the social sciences and the ethical issues related to those methods; apply knowledge from at least one social science discipline to a contemporary social phenomena to assess its causes, consequences and ethical implications; analyze a social phenomenon using an appropriate method, including the formulation and testing of a hypothesis through data collection the analysis of relevant data as well as and a review of relevant literature.

Social Science courses are designated with a (S) symbol on semester course listings. A complete list of “S” courses may be found below:

  • Anthropology 200- Cultural Anthropology
  • Anthropology 210- Introduction to Archaeology
  • Anthropology 255- Analysis of Cultural Materials
  • Anthropology 310- Historic and Military Archaeology
  • Business 101- Introduction to Business Administration
  • Economics 102- Survey of Economics
  • Economics 251- Principles of Microeconomics
  • Economics 252- Principles of Macroeconomics
  • Education 227- Principals of Teaching Seminar: Middle Childhood
  • Education 228- Principals of Teaching Seminar: Adolescent to Young Adult
  • Education 229- Principals of Teaching Seminar: Multi-Age
  • Media 156- Mass Media in Society
  • Management 300- Principles of Management
  • Non-Departmental 105- Truth About Social Class
  • Political Science 125- Introduction to Politics and Government
  • Political Science 221- Global Politics
  • Political Science 227- American National Government
  • Political Science 240- African Politics
  • Political Science 263- European Politics
  • Political Science 270- Asian and Pacific Rim Politics
  • Political Science 283- Politics of the Middle East
  • Political Science 304- Congress
  • Political Science 324- American Foreign Policy
  • Political Science 376- Global Issues I
  • Political Science 377- Global Issues II
  • Psychology 101- General Psychology
  • Psychology 206- Child Psychology
  • Psychology 207- Adolescent Psychology
  • Psychology 209- Abnormal Psychology

III. Global/Cultural Perspectives Requirement (G)

Learning Outcomes: Students will gain exposure of and demonstrate an understanding of various cultural experiences associated with living in a diverse world through one or more of the following areas: use appropriate language or terminology to describe cultural practices; articulate multiple perspectives in regard to various cultural practices; identify similarity and different cultural values, political structure, social networks, economics or religious/spiritual issues.

All students must successfully complete both of the following:

Pass one foreign language course at the 102 level or the equivalent.*^

Languages may be found below:

  • Chinese 102- Elementary Chinese
  • French 102- Elementary French
  • Greek 112- New Testament Greek
  • German 102- Introduction to German
  • Japan 102- Beginning Japanese
  • Spanish 102- Elementary Spanish
  • American Sign Language at the 102 level (not available at Heidelberg)

AND

Successfully complete one global/cultural experience.**

Global/Cultural Perspectives courses are designated with a (G) symbol on semester course listings.

A complete list of “G” courses may be found below:

  • Anthropology 200- Cultural Anthropology
  • Anthropology 210- Introduction to Archaeology
  • Anthropology 310- Historic and Military Archaeology
  • Biology 115- Food, Medicine, and Drugs
  • Communication 246- Intercultural Communication
  • Education 336- Methods in Foreign Language
  • Intervention Specialist 265- Diversity in Today’s Schools
  • Intervention Specialist 266- Education Camp Clinical Experience
  • English 154- Literary Theme: Identity and Culture
  • English 307- Literature by Women
  • English 340- Major World Author
  • German 290- Preparation for Study Abroad
  • German 317- Germany, Present and Past
  • German 318- Germany, Present and Past
  • German 489- German Portfolio
  • History 105- World Civilization
  • History 106- World Civilization
  • History 113- Asian Civilizations I
  • History 114- Asian Civilizations II
  • Music 213- World Music
  • Non-Departmental 107- Introduction to China
  • Non-Departmental 206- Introduction to US/Mexico Boarder Issues
  • Non-Departmental 345- Service Learning US/Mexico Boarder
  • Non-Departmental 366- Sex and Violence in Fairy Tales
  • Philosophy 200- Aesthetics
  • Philosophy 309- History of Western Philosophy: Ancient and Medieval
  • Philosophy 310- History of Western Philosophy: Modern
  • Philosophy 317- Philosophy of Religion
  • Political Science 221- Global Politics
  • Political Science 240- African Politics
  • Political Science 263- European Politics
  • Political Science 270- Asian and Pacific Rim Politics
  • Political Science 283- Politics of the Middle East
  • Political Science 293- Introduction to Canada
  • Political Science 376- Global Issues I
  • Psychology 407- Multicultural Psychology
  • Religion 204- Religions of the World
  • Spanish 290- Study Abroad Preparation
  • Spanish 321- Survey of Latin American Literature
  • Spanish 325- Spanish Literature Survey
  • Spanish 330- Contemporary Latin American Narrative
  • Spanish 333- Spanish Culture and Civilization
  • Spanish 334- Latin American Culture and Civilization
  • Spanish 489- Spanish Portfolio

*NOTE: 102-level equivalency includes: 201-level placement on the language placement test; CLEP, IB or AP foreign language credit; or status as an international student for whom English is a second language.

**NOTE: Students who exempt out of the foreign language requirement must complete two global/cultural experiences.

^Students that reach equivalencies through the above, must complete one of the following:
A second Global/Culture course listed in the above (G) category, or
A second language that is other than the language exempted from (second language will need to be at 102 level), or
A higher level language course within the student's exempted language (SPA 201, 202, 305, 307, 319, 320, 411, 412; GER 201, 202, 301, 302, 317, 318, 415, 416, 417, 418; FRN 201, 202)

Alternative global/cultural Experiences

A university-approved study-abroad experience of at least four weeks. (One semester abroad counts as two global/cultural experiences.) Or, another experience approved in writing by the Provost.

IV. Personal Health and Wellness Requirement (P)

Learning Outcomes: Students should have a thorough understanding of how to positively contribute to their own health and wellness through one of the following areas: students will assess their current state of health and wellness via completion of quantitative learning tools; student will demonstrate knowledge of current scientific data regarding cost and benefits of health choices; students will develop strategies to maintain lifelong physical, mental and social wellness.

Personal Health and Wellness courses are designated with a (P) symbol on semester course listings. A complete list of “P” courses may be found below:

All students must successfully complete one of the following:

Lifetime activity coursework (HPE 100) totaling two semester hours.*

OR

One course from the following list:

  • Anthropology 205- Physical Anthropology
  • Anthropology 345- Drug Dealers & Prostitutes
  • Athletic Training 389- Principles of Strength, Conditioning and Exercise Prescription
  • Health and Physical Education 103- Strategies for Fitness and a Healthy Lifestyle
  • Health and Physical Education 116- Health and Wellness
  • Health and Physical Education 306- Nutrition
  • Health Sciences 425- Health Care Seminar
  • Political Science 240- African Politics
  • Theatre 215- Discover the Body Through Movement
  • Theatre 216- Introduction to Dance Technique

* Notes: Students may count a maximum of two semester hours of HPE 100 coursework toward the 120 hours needed for graduation. Students have an opportunity to substitute one non-credit, intercollegiate sport (HPE 050A-Z) toward one hour of the two semester hour requirement. While intercollegiate athletic participation is not considered an academic course, to manage successful completion, a grade of Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory will be assigned by the head coach/instructor. All academic policies will apply to the intercollegiate athletic registration.

Special Exemptions

While the University is committed to the General Education requirements as the foundation of a broad liberal arts education, it is also recognized that in a few extraordinary situations (for example, a student with two majors with foreign study and/or internship requirements) a student may have difficulty scheduling the completion of the General Education requirements. In such cases, a student may petition the Office of Academic Affairs for Special Exemptions from not more than two courses in the General Education requirements. Petitioning students must have a minimum 3.00 grade point average and have completed not more than 60 semester hours of university credit. All exemptions will be reviewed on an individual basis and do not reduce the 120 hours required for graduation.

Responsibility and Major Related Requirements for all Majors and Programs

Responsibility Requirement: The AIM (advise, inspire, mentor) Hei mentoring program provides first-time degree-seeking and transfer students with a structured means by which they can design and implement a program of study—both inside and outside the classroom—aimed at achieving the University’s four responsibility goals:

  1. Values and pursue academic excellence
  2. Develop personal and professional responsibility
  3. Act with integrity in all aspects of one’s life
  4. Become engaged through participation and service in one’s communities

Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of the AIM Hei program, students will be able to demonstrate:

  1. An understanding of the nature of a liberal arts education, including how the Heidelberg general education program or honors program, individual majors and extracurricular experiences relate to such an education;
  2. How co- and extracurricular experiences relate to a liberal arts education;
  3. The ability to set academic, professional and personal goals and to make plans related to the fulfillment of those goals;
  4. The ability to reflect upon experiences and to use that reflection as the basis for modifying goals and plans related to their academic, professional and personal lives;
  5. An awareness of support and planning resources at Heidelberg University related to academic, professional and personal issues;
  6. An understanding of degree requirements and auditing, along with the course registration process at Heidelberg University.

Exemptions: Transfer Students with 24 credit hours or more are exempt from the AIM Hei program. Arrowhead campus students and Tiffin campus non-traditional students will complete AIM Hei 1011 that contains topics relevant to their situation and transition to Heidelberg. A student Is is defined as a non-traditional student if he or she meets one or more of the following criteria: 22 years of age or older; has had a least a two year break In his or her education; military veteran; holds a GED rather than a high school diploma; or, married or single with dependent.

Major Related Requirements: All students must pass the junior-level discipline-specific written and oral communication requirement and the senior capstone experience in at least one major.

Junior Level Discipline-Specific Communication (JWO): This requirement will be determined separately for each major. Students must fulfill this requirement through courses taken at Heidelberg University. Students are introduced to the conventions of writing and speaking within their discipline, on the rhetorical, stylistic, and documentational levels.

Senior Capstone Experience: The capstone requirement provides an experience which connects learning and doing. It requires the student to synthesize theory, knowledge and experience. Students have the opportunity to reflect upon their learning experiences while at Heidelberg.

Graduation/Commencement

Graduation is the completion of all degree requirements as recorded on the official transcript. Commencement is the ceremony that celebrates the completion of a degree. Participation in the commencement ceremony does not imply that a student officially graduated.

Diplomas are awarded and distributed three times per year, and there is one commencement ceremony in May. Completion deadlines for work are August 25, December 22 and the Wednesday prior to commencement in May. To qualify for a given deadline, all coursework including assignments and exams must be completed by these deadlines either at Heidelberg University or with special permission at another institution. CLEP exams also must be taken by these dates. Documentation of work completed through another institution or CLEP scores must arrive by September 15, January 15 and May 30 respectively. For further information on the required documentation, please contact the Office of the Registrar.

Incomplete Grade Clause for Graduating Students
Students receiving an incomplete grade because of a course requirement that occurs after the term ends as documented within the course syllabus, shall be eligible for all honors and awards. The University recognizes that these outside events are a significant part of the student experience and that the student should be permitted to participate in award assemblies. In the event that the incomplete grade lowers the student’s academic record to no longer be eligible for these honors, the student will be required to return all medals and memorabilia to the University no later than two weeks following the Incomplete grade becoming a letter grade. Those students who do not return their medals and/or memorabilia by the deadline will incur a replacement fee.
This exemption clause does not permit the student to meet degree requirements. Students will be permitted to walk at commencement and will be eligible to meet degree requirements once the incomplete grade becomes a letter grade.